TH Blog Love - Our Favourite Greens Of The Week


Earth Echo: Africa Entry 5 by Philippe Cousteau
"Up until 1996, fisherman slaughtered up to 25 dolphins a year to use as bait for longline shark fishing. That year, the dolphin killing stopped and fisherman turned to a more environmentally friendly pursuit, dolphin watching. That has steadily grown in popularity where it now employs over 100 fisherman. However, the practice is not the most sensitive I have ever seen and a new worry has replaced the old one."

Live Green: Carnival of the Green # 107 by Wayne Green
"LiveGreen is excited to be the 107th host of Carnival of the Green, hosted by TreeHugger. It's our first run as host and we are glad to see you." Carnival this week includes: eco-friendly vodka, choosing which lipstick to use, nice green dishes and cups, coffee and chocolate. It's definitely the party season then!New Scientist Environment: Al Gore tells Bali the inconvenient truth on US by Catherine Brahic. "Former US vice president Al Gore just walked into the room to a standing ovation. I am in one of the big halls in the Bali International Conference Centre in Indonesia and Gore has arrived to give delegates a final pep talk before negotiations conclude tomorrow."

Tao of Change: Activists Act by Tao Oliveto
"What is an activist? Who are they? What do they do? What do they want? Are they idealists or realists? These are some of the questions I ask myself daily...Does the way I live make me an activist? Hardly. I only became in activist when I was willing to step out into the world with both my actions and my voice."

World Changing: The Option of Urbanism by Alex Steffen
"I'm in Barcelona, where I delivered a talk on sustainability and the future for the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona's remarkable NOW series, and where Erica and I have stayed on for a working vacation...Barcelona, people here will tell you, is not only the most vital and stylish city in Spain, but the densest city in Europe."

Tags: Bali | Carnival Of The Green

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