Roz Savage Rows Safely to Port After 104 Days at Sea (Video)

Photo via Roz Savage

Roz Savage has just completed stage two of her journey rowing solo across the Pacific Ocean. She landed in Tarawa, a small atoll in the Republic of Kiribati after 104 solid days of rowing. That means two things: First, she's the first woman to row solo across the Pacific. Second, while stage two is done, there's a really, really big stage 3 to look forward to. But her message makes the miles worth it.
Roz Savage is an incredible eco-warrior, putting the planet front and center on her mission. Stage 1, a 2,700 mile row from California to Hawaii, focused on the pollution found in the ocean. Stage 2, bringing her from Hawaii to Tarawa, focused on climate change. And stage 3 will take her all the way to Australia.

Roz first started out 11 years ago when she rowed solo across the Atlantic. The attention she gained gave her an excellent platform for motivating others to take action on environmental issues and to face their own life challenges. With stage 2, Savage states:

"The climate change crisis we face requires immediate action from every level of our global society, but the problem is so grave that many people are overwhelmed and simply don't know what they can do to help," says Roz. "That's why I aim to inspire people to choose simple solutions that cost nothing and are easy to work into the busy routines of their daily lives. You might feel like one little choice doesn't make a big difference, that it's just a drop in the ocean. But those little choices and actions add up quickly - and they do make a world of difference."

Nothing highlights that more clearly than each small stroke she took out on the open ocean that brought her thousands of miles towards her ultimate goal. We give Savage a HUGE Congratulations on her arrival.

More on Roz Savage
Roz Savage Rows Home a Key Message for Blue August (Video)
Roz Savage Rows the Pacific! (Slideshow)
Roz Savage Takes Ocean Activism for a Row

Tags: Activism | Blue August | Global Climate Change | Oceans


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