Plane Food Café Delivers the Joys of Flying Without The CO2


the view inside

George Monbiot told us that flying is dying; London artist Richard DeDomenici tells us that a return transatlantic flight is equivalent in CO2 and pollution output to driving a car 30 miles a day for a year. So the artist/humorist has developed the Plane Food Café to "help discourage the environmentally conscious and paranoid from further flying, whilst simultaneously enabling the 95% of people in the world who have never travelled by plane to inexpensively experience the delights of aviation cuisine."


Our flight attendant Richard explains

It is part of the 2 Degrees exhibition of 20 "radical and politically engaged artists to create work that confronts climate change head on."

And what an experience it is, starting with an inflight movie discussing the perils and problems of flying, plus a suggestion for dealing with Canada Geese like the ones that brought down that plane into the Hudson River: Gather up the geese pieces and serve them to First Class. He calls the stuff that comes out of the back of the engines "snarge", and to everyone's relief, did not serve snarge pie.

After the movie, dinner is served from the cart; it tastes surprisingly good. DeDomenici notes that lower air pressure in the cabin at flying altitudes dulls the taste buds, and they don't want to add salt as it will dehydrate the passengers further, so they are careful about cranking up the level of spices to compensate.


A happy passenger

He constructed his Café from fixtures and fittings found at aircraft reclamation yards, and ordered his food from the London City Airport, from a caterer who wished to remain anonymous.


The plane is set up inside a prefab flatpack container. All images Bonnie Alter

More on Richard DeDomenici at his temporary website, more on the Two Degrees event at the Arts Admin site.
Other Flying Experiences that never leave the ground:
Recycled Hotels in Boats, Trains and Planes
Creative Recycling: 747 Turned into Hostel

Tags: Artists | George Monbiot | London

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