Artist's lace-themed street art beautifies cities & honors handicraft culture

NeSpoon
© NeSpoon

When you mention lace, most of us think of grannies nodding off in rockers and stuffy, boring afternoon tea (or if you're a guy, maybe something more risqué -- or not, to be fair). We're unlikely to think of fantastic street art, but that's exactly what Warsaw, Poland based street artist NeSpoon is doing with her lace-themed, larger-than-life urban artworks, and since coming onto our radar some years ago, her oeuvre has grown considerably.

NeSpoon© NeSpoon
NeSpoon© NeSpoon

One gets an instant visual jolt from these harmonious patterns painted on the chaotic jumble of the urban landscape. I wrote several years ago that "NeSpoon's work defies categorization. Though it can be aligned with the renaissance of the 'new' street art of urban beautification -- her approach is more craft-oriented and also imposes the organic-ness and visual organization of lace onto the urban consciousness."

Working in this incarnation as a street artist since 2009, NeSpoon either uses actual lace from traditional patterns, and either hand-paints the patterns on the wall or enlarges them into stencils that can then used for applying paint.

NeSpoon© NeSpoon
NeSpoon© NeSpoon

She has also made string art with these lace patterns, creating webs in nature, on the street or in abandoned buildings, that connect invisible elements together. In addition, she also makes ceramic plaques of lace, which she adheres to buildings, or nestles inside the hollows of trees.

NeSpoon© NeSpoon
NeSpoon© NeSpoon
NeSpoon© NeSpoon

I love how she describes the codified cultural language hidden in lace:

In lace there is an aesthetic code which is deeply embedded in every culture. In every lace we find symmetry, and some kind of order and harmony. Isn’t that what we all seek for instinctively?

NeSpoon© NeSpoon

In a society where everything is increasingly mechanized, digitized and pivoting around instant gratification, lace-making seems like an anachronism. But going slow may be the antidote to this frenzy of speed and automation, and what's old does become new again, as we've seen with the upcycling movement, or dumb phones making a comeback. The satisfaction of making something with your own hands will never go out of style, and beautifying our cities with these amazing patterns, preserving that richness of cultural meaning and the dignity of handicraft, is a great thing. More over on NeSpoon's Behance.

[Via: This Is Colossal]

Tags: Artists | Arts

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