On MNN: Edward Burtynsky, Noma Restaurant and the future of the Sharing Economy

salt river reservation
© Ed Burtynsky

We're rounding up the posts from our sister site, MNN, that we think would most appeal to TreeHuggers.

Edward Burtynsky peels back the curtain on the perils of modern existence

Ed Burtynsky has been a TreeHugger favorite since we started; he is one of the few people to actually have his own tag on the site. (Elon Musk doesn't even have that honor!). Now he has a new show up at a gallery in Berkeley, California that naturally focuses on his Water series. The artist notes:

My hope is that these pictures will stimulate a process of thinking about something essential to our survival; something we often take for granted — until it's gone.

More on MNN: Edward Burtynsky peels back the curtain on the perils of modern existence

Copenhagen's famed Noma restaurant to be centerpiece of new urban farm

NomaMNN/via

Say it ain't so! Matt Hickman writes about how one of the world's great restaurants is closing.

Foraging foodies, smoked quail egg aficionados and the culinary-minded Instagram elite were left stunned earlier this week after news broke that lauded Danish chef René Redzepi is shuttering his pioneering Copenhagen eatery, Noma, after a wildly influential 12-year run. Redzepi, a Copenhagen native of Danish and Macedonian extraction, plans to hold his final dinner service on New Year’s Eve 2016.

Christiana entranceLloyd Alter at the gates of Christiana (photos not permitted inside)/CC BY 2.0

In fact, it is re-opening down the road a bit, complete with urban farm near Christiania, the "home to biker gangs, feral cats, anarchist squatters, aging hippies and hashish dealers aplenty." No kidding; I was there a few weeks ago and the air is just redolent of the stuff. This is a really smart move; everybody will have the serious munchies.

More on MNN: Copenhagen's famed Noma restaurant to be centerpiece of new urban farm

Is the sharing economy dead?

drillScott Vincent on Flickr/CC BY 2.0

That power drill will be used around 12 to 15 minutes in its entire lifetime. It’s kind of ridiculous, isn’t it? Because what you need is the hole, not the drill.

We have all been using Rachel Botsman's quote forever as the explanation for the sharing economy. Alex Steffen used it. The New York Times used it. Except it isn't really true; As one failed sharing economy pioneer noted,

For a drill, which by the way now costs $30, and you can get it on Amazon Now and have this thing delivered to you in an hour if you live in New York City — for something worth $30, is it really worth your time to trek potentially 25 minutes to go get something that you spent $15 to use for the day, and then have to trek back?"

More on MNN: Is the sharing economy dead?

Tags: Ed Burtynsky | MNN

WHAT'S HOT ON FACEBOOK

treehugger slideshows