On MNN: Big beds, Working from home is the worst, the death of the stick shift.

dog and computers
CC BY 2.0 Walter Rumsby on Flickr

We're rounding up the posts from our sister site, MNN, that we think would most appeal to TreeHuggers.

Telecommuting isn't for everyone (or every job)

Over on Fusion, they title a post It’s official: Working from home is the worst It's a look at a study with the mouthful title How Effective Is Telecommuting? Assessing the Status of Our Scientific Findings. which does not make it official and does not say anything like it's the worst. It does say that telecommuting probably doesn't work for forklift drivers or waitresses, and that "Telecommuting arrangements bring to the forefront the notion that work is no longer a place but what you do, and new ways of working are likely to continue." I don't know what they put in the coffee at Fusion.
More on MNN

Family of 7 sleeps together in one giant IKEA-hacked bed (and they've never slept better)

family bed© Elizabeth Boyce/Wandering the World Below

Bedtime at the Boyce family home in Plano, Texas used to be a nightmare. Each of the family's five kids had trouble sleeping for one reason or another and were up and wandering the halls in need of water, the bathroom, or most importantly, attention from their parents.

So they built a giant bed and all seven of them sleep together. We love the idea of living together in smaller spaces but this might be carrying it a bit far. More at MNN.

How much about the future did 'Back to the Future' get right?

back to the future dayback to the Future/Screen capture

Posts on Back to the Future Day were everywhere, mostly talking about shoes and hoverboards. But I thought the most interesting predictions had to do with urban planning; the main square of Hill Valley was a dump in the first movie, but in the future it is restored, lively, gentrified, and is complete with a grey-haired heritage activist trying to save the clock. Meanwhile the suburbs have turned into dumps. More on MNN.

Why self-driving cars won't replace mass transit

volvo self-driving car© Volvo

Treehugger Sami ponders:

If all the hype over self-driving cars has left you wondering what true automotive autonomy would mean for traditional, centralized mass transit systems, you are not alone. After all, when we can all hail an autonomous taxi that comes right to our door and drops us where we need to go, won't all the subways, light rail systems and bus routes start to feel a little old-fashioned?

Actually, this is an argument that is being used by some politicians to kill rail projects right now. More at MNN

Is the stick shift going extinct?

Sign on carLloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

I saw this sign on a car while running in Toronto last weekend and I liked it so much I wrote a whole post around it. More on MNN

Stevens Institute of Technology takes 2015 Solar Decathlon by storm

solar decathlon winner© Thomas Kelsey/U.S Department of Energy Solar Decathlon

TreeHugger usually covers the Solar Decathlon like a thick insulating blanket, and this year it just slipped by us. Fortunately Matt Hickman does great coverage on MNN. He also notes that it was a lower-key affair than usual, and that there were some rule changes, the most important and obnoxious one being the banning of non-American teams, because as the head of the Decathlon notes: "In years past, these foreign teams have come and beat the pants off the American teams and then they run back to their home countries."

It's a good thing I didn't cover it, because it would have turned into one long rant about that. More on MNN

It's hard to cut cable if you want to watch sports

tv ball gameLloyd Alter/CC BY 2.0

My struggle to watch the Blue Jays without cable. It wasn't easy and it's crazy that I should have to do this; in Toronto where I live, the cable company is also a major internet service provider, it owns the stadium and it owns the Blue Jays. It owns everything except MLB. More on MNN.

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