Jargon Watch: A Field Guide To Sprawl


Images by Jim Wark from a Field Guide to Sprawl

I thought I knew a lot of these terms from my days in architecture and development, but there is a whole new vocabulary out there, catalogued by Dolores Hayden in her book A Field Guide to Sprawl. Above is an "Alligator"- "Real estate that eats money — for instance, a plot that a developer has subdivided and is paying taxes on, but hasn't yet developed."

This is Ground Cover: -"Inexpensive, easily bulldozed buildings such as self-storage units, constructed to generate income while a developer holds land."

And this is a LULU: "A "locally unwanted land use" creates a problem for people because of the way it looks, smells, sounds or pollutes. It may be a parking lot, a waste incinerator, a prison, or a nuclear facility."

Great fun, via the Infrastructurist, who starts his post with the incomprehensible:

You know that leapfrog pod of snoutnoses out in the rhubarb by the edge node?

More on sprawl:
Why Tackling Urban Sprawl Is More About Proper Planning Than Eco-Towns & Green Buildings
Big Surprise: America's Fittest Cities Are Also Most Walkable Cities
::The Problems with Green Sprawl
::Ten Things Wrong With Sprawl
California Set to Adopt Nation's First Anti-Sprawl Law

Tags: Housing Industry | Urban Planning

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