Hollywood Donates Big to Rescue an Icon, Stars Flaunt Green Fashion at the Oscars, and More


Photo via Sörn @ flickr

On Thursday, the Trust for Public Land released a roster of Hollywood A-listers and companies--including Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson, the Walt Disney Company, the LucasFilm Foundation, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Steven Spielberg, Warner Bros., Fox, Sony, NBC Universal, and Time Warner--who have collectively donated more than $3 million to save one iconic piece of land: Cahuenga Peak.And while the name might not mean much to people outside of the film industry, you'd know the peak if you saw it: It's home to the famous Hollywood sign. The 138 acres behind the "H", previously owned by Howard Hughes, are on the market for $22 million--and come with the zoning rights to build just four homes. While the Trust for Public Land has the option to buy the plot at a discounted rate of $12.5 million, they have to come up with the funds by April 14. Want to help? Donate a minimum of $25 through the Save Cahuenga Peak organization. (Via Ecorazzi)

Green Blossoms on the Oscars Red Carpet



Photo via America Superstar/Rick Rowell/ABC

After years of red carpet coverage, the Oscars are as much about "Who are you wearing?" as they are about who's going to win--and this year, among all the Marchesa, Armani Prive, Oscar de la Renta, and Chanel, the green gowns held their own. Best Director nominee James Cameron didn't walk away with the statue for his work on the green-themed Avatar, but his wife, Suzi, showed off some Nav'i blue in a dress made of peace silk by Michigan State University student Jillian Ganz. And while Best Actor nominee Colin Firth also didn't win, his wife, Livia, glowed in an upcycled Orsola de Castro gown. Even the men got into the spirit, with Food, Inc., director Robert Kenner wearing an organic-wool tux from Loomstate, and Best Supporting Actor nominee Woody Harrelson showing off a basic black Burberry model made entirely (and not surprisingly) from hemp.

Stephen Colbert and Annie Leonard Talk Stuff

The Story of Stuff filmmaker Annie Leonard sat down with Stephen Colbert to talk about her new book of the same name, which deals with the endless cycle of consumption--and the way "our stuff owns us." "Our quest for more stuff, and the work you have to do to maintain it, is taking the place of things that provide deeper happiness," she says. But that doesn't have to mean a total ban on buying: See how paying attention to what you purchase can make a difference in the health and environment of people around the world--and how Stephen Colbert thinks plastic action figures might just help spread the message.

Bob Barker Gives PETA a Boost

Photo via fireballk2588 @ flickr

Bob Barker's support for animals is well-documented: along with his classic request for The Price is Right viewers to get their pets spayed or neutered, he wrote this article calling for the end of roadside zoos and even gave his name (and $5 million) to the Sea Shepherd organization for the development of another ship in the fight against Japanese whaling. This week, he stepped up again, donating a reported $2.5 million to PETA for the construction of the organization's new Los Angeles office. The renovated structure, which will house the marketing, youth outreach, campaign, and media departments, will be known as "The Bob Barker Building" (and we hope that new digs will inspire some more effective advertising).

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