'Green' magazine: Sustainable Architecture in Australia

Remember how it was starting a new school, moving to a new neighbourhood, joining a sporting club? You feel the odd one out and wonder how you’ll ever fit in and accepted on your merit. So it is with new players entering a market that seems already mature and well established. In this case we are talking about the Australian green magazine market, specifically the eco-building end of it. The old timer is Owner Builder mag, which went through new ownership itself and gained colour covers and inserts. Although not exclusively about green aspects of building, it does have a large quota of such materials in its pages. Five or so years ago Environ (PDF link) started out as a trade publication on eco-architecture that later made the transition to the newstand. Around this time the housing industry established their own mag, known as GreenSmart. The Alternative Technology Association then launched Sanctuary, which has evolved from glossy photos and green house plans to more in-depth articles. Into this crowded field, which already includes many international journals and TV tie-in magazines comes ‘Green’, with the tagline: Sustainable architecture and landscape design. The debut issue is a very impressive 100 pages covering lush photography of the usual architect designed grandstand ecohouse through to cute cartoons of kids donning jumpers (that’s what we call sweaters) instead of turning up the heating. The myriad other articles include pieces on renovations, using recycled timbers, food miles, eco friendly resorts, willow trees conversion from environmental weed to furniture. Green is polished new entry in a crowded space. It will be curious to observe whether it is the shy type with bottle lensed glasses that no-one picks for their team or the favourite new kid on the block. The more this stuff is in people’s faces the better we’ll all be. (Disclaimer: This writer also scribes for the aforementioned Environ magazine.) ::Green magazine.

Tags: Architecture | Australia