Front Page of Newspaper is a Bouquet of Roses


Image from the Crossed Cow

Free newspapers are a curse, as they pile up, abandoned, in subways, buses and streets. London is down to two now, Metro in the morning and one at night. Metro challenged design and ad agencies to come up with an inspiring "coverwrap" (front and back page) as they say in the biz.

The best was this one: turning the front page into a bunch of flowers by rolling up the paper. It was created by The Partners who said that they "wanted the idea to have a purpose: getting people to reuse and pass on their newspaper."
Image from the Crossed Cow

The front page image is a single red rose, the back a bird of paradise and the inside has a bouquet of daffodils and another of pink roses. As they said "Everyone likes flowers. You can use them as an emergency gift, to say sorry or just to cheer someone up."

Metro is also running a competition for artists to transform and recycle old copies of the paper into art. Called Metro Re-Create, the contest is open to all art students, with the stipulation that the majority of the piece and any other materials must be from a recycled or sustainable source. They specifically request that artists use 'used' papers rather than taking fresh ones from the Metro bins. It's in its third year running and some of the past entries have been ingenious.


Image from e-bay
This dress was made of 1,000 paper origami cranes, from 55 copies of the newspaper. The winner said: "I wanted to make a little green contribution to our environment and to prove that the things we don't consider striking can be transformed into something beautiful."

This stool was made from 89 copies of Metro scavenged from around the London subway.

The paper claims "We also print Metro on predominantly recycled paper, off-set carbon emissions associated with delivering Metro and support green charity Trees for Cities along with a variety of other environmental initiatives."

Tags: Conservation | Contests | Designers | Recycled Consumer Goods

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