Carnival of the Green #38

It's Monday, and for green blog-watchers, that can only mean one thing: the Carnival of the Green! Treehugger is proud to host this week's edition of the Carnival, the brainstorm of green blogs extraordinaire City Hippy and TriplePundit. If this is your first COG, no need to worry: settle in, click around and enjoy the best of the past week's content from green blogs around the world. Here's a little music to put you in the right frame of mind. And away we go...Food

You can't have a carnival without plenty of treats to tempt your taste buds, and the Carnival of the Green is no exception. Lots to sample from this week...

A Blog Around the Clock muses on how California's wine industry will adjust to changed climate conditions fostered by global warming. Boris believes it will adjust, but wine snobs may not be happy!

Organic Authority gives some tips on finding out more about the sources of organic foods you purchase, even if they're certified organic. According to Laura, meat and dairy products are particularly susceptible to varying levels of "organicness" (organicity?) even when certified.

Judy K, the Savvy Vegetarian, asks a simple question: "What does the decline in home cooking have to do with the environment?" The answer? Plenty. Judy takes a thorough look at the environmental impact of "convenience food," and argues that a return to home cooking as the norm could lead the way to a more sustainable way of life.

Consumers and Consumption

Of course, we all "consume" more than food, and this week's COG has an array of tips and ideas for making responsible consumer choices.

Dawn at Frugal for Life shares a pledge for simple living with her readers, noting she believes that such statements are good ways to make responsible consumption a normal part of her daily routine.

Jen's Green Journal and City Hippy announce a new project: The Christmas Lights Campaign. Both bloggers will be promoting responsible gift-giving by asking people to commit to buying compact fluorescent light bulbs for friends and family in addition to other gifts you might give. You can help them promote this campaign by placing one of their "Word of Blog" badges on your blog or web site.

marigolds2 at The Blue Voice takes note of one of the greenest ways to find the things you need (or to get rid of those you don't): Freecycling.

Enrique at commonground considers the element of surfing (on waves, not online) that often is the least green: the surf board (in PDF).

And Jasmin at The Worsted Witch corresponds with the folks at Paper nor Plastic about their choice to line their reusable shopping bags with vinyl.

Energy

Energy posts are a stock feature at the Carnival, and several good ones came in this week.

Why Travel to France provides an overview of the French biofuels industry, and notes the barriers that exist in the country's legal and business sectors that prevent French citizens from being able to buy 100% pure biofuels. The irony here is that many of the fuels they could buy were developed and are produced completely in France, while the oil and diesel being added comes from elsewhere. Apparently, the French don't hold biodiesel to the same standard as wine...

debitage considers the question of fairness in the choice of Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the US' only nuclear waste repository, and shows why the arguments made by supporters of the project likely aren't getting through to Nevada residents.

And Interesting Things of the Day gives a primer on peak oil theory.

Land and Resource Protection

Lots of news this week on efforts to protect a variety of natural resources.

Nick at TriplePundit considers how non-confrontational communications likely played a role in US President Bush's decision to create a huge national monument in the waters between Hawaii and Midway Island.

The Good Human provides some background on Tree People, an urban forest in the middle of Los Angeles.

A Girl's Guide to Managing Projects examines the efforts of 24-year-old Sophie Hopkins to save Britain's Fordhall Farm from sale to a developer wanting to tear down the 300-year-old farm and build a yogurt plant.

Colorado's Save the Ribble Campaign details the Preston City Council's Statement of Community Involvement, and notes how the campaign seeks to serve the interests of local residents around the Ribble River.

Transportation

Both air travel and cycling make it to the carnival this week.

Don Bosch, the Evangelical Ecologist, muses on the Bishop of London's claim that air travel is a "symptom of sin," as well as other stories from the week.

Clay and Wattles considers the other side of the technological spectrum, and reflects on the elements that come together to create the ideal bike rack.

The Carnival of the Green's Very Eclectic Midway

Other news, thoughts and developments from around the Green Blogosphere...

Generative Transformation explains in detail the concept of Namaste Economics, an element of its vision for an Authenticity Revolution.

Greenthinkers takes note of a deal being offered by Ecoist: go see An Inconvenient Truth, and they'll plant a tree on your behalf.

Camden Kiwi reviews John S. Dryzek's The Politics of the Earth, and calls it one of the most important books they've read on environmental politics and the condition of the planet.

Greener Magazine announces its new media partnership with the National Radio Project, and highlights the radio network's story on "four young ecology activists."

sludgie points to a new study on tiger habitat, and the possibilities for preserving it that may have been overlooked in the past.

And, finally, some guy names Heston Wunderkrantz barges in on City Hippy, and announces his plans to use the space to promote a new comic strip about himself. Blog-squatting? Who'd a thunk...

That's the Carnival for this week! Next week, COG goes back to its roots at City Hippy. We hope that Heston guy isn't planning something devious...