By the Numbers: Super Bowl Facts and Figures

PDA.PHOTO/CC BY 2.0

Football fans may have to wait until Sunday to watch the Super Bowl--but for those who just can't get enough, we've compiled a list of the most incredible Super Bowl related facts and figures for you on the heels of the big game; From how many people will be tuned-in, to how many blades of grass are on the field--and everything in between. If you've ever wondered what the carbon-footprint of the Super Bowl is, or if you'd like to know how many Olympic-sized swimming pools worth of beer is drunk during the game, we've got the answers here.

WHO WILL BE WATCHING?
151.6 million: Number of people who will watch at least part of the game.

194 million: Approximate number of blades of grass on the football field.

232: Number of countries and territories in which the game will be broadcast.

34: Number of languages the game is broadcast in.

1: Number of languages in which the word "football" doesn't mean "soccer."


HOW MUCH FOOD WILL BE CONSUMED?
8 million: Total pounds of popcorn consumed on Super Bowl Sunday.

28 million: Pounds of potato chips consumed.

53.5 million: Pounds of avocados consumed.

222,792: Number of football fields worth of farmland to grow all that
corn, potatoes, and avocados.

11.8: Depth, in feet, of guacamole consumed if it were spread across the football field.

293,000: Number of miles of potato chips, laid end to end, consumed during the game.

1 billion: Number of chicken wings consumed on Super Bowl Sunday.

325.5 million: Gallons of beer drank by Americans that day.

493: Number of Olympic-sized swimming pools that could be filled with all that beer.

20%: Increase in ant-acid sales the Monday after the game.

7 million: Number of employees who will not show up to work Monday.

WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO POWER THE SUPER BOWL?
10,780: Kilograms of Oxygen required to sustain the audience during the game.

4,800: Kilograms of Oxygen produced by the grass on the field during the game.

310,000: Pounds of carbon emissions generated by the Super Bowl.

1,000: Number of NFL defensive linemen to equal that weight.

187,000: Kilowatt/hours of energy estimated to be spent at the Super Bowl stadium.

10,004,603: Kilowatt/hours of power consumed by home TVs tuned in to the game.

9,000,000: Current Kilowatt/hours of solar power generated in the US.

22,000: Number of parking spaces at the stadium.

264,000: Number of bicycles all those spaces could hold.


HOW MUCH MONEY MOVES AROUND FOR THE BIG GAME?
$5.6 billion: Amount consumers will spend on Super Bowl related items.

$400 million: Amount of money added to the local economy because of the game.

35%: Ticket holders writing-off the game as a business expense.

$12,500: Price Tiffany charges to produce the Vince Lombardi Trophy.

$2.8 million: Cost for a 30-second advertisment slot during the game.

20.5: Number of minutes worth of ads it would take to pay for a new
Sun Stadium at that rate.

45: Number of minutes worth advertisements during last year's game.

41%: Percent of Super Bowl viewers surveyed who will re-watch this year's ads online.

2.9 million: Number of HD TVs bought for the Super Bowl in 2009.

AND WHAT ABOUT THOSE SUPER BOWL PARTIES?
41: Days in advance, on average, Super Bowl plans are made.

20 million: Number of Americans attending a Super Bowl party.

17: Average number of people attending each party.

5%: Percent of people who watch the big game alone.

40%: Percent of Super Bowl viewers who are not football fans.

25%: Percent of women who watch the game and enjoy it.

10 million: Number of man-hours spent preparing food for the Super
Bowl party.

10 million: Number of man-hours spent making the movie
Avatar.


References: thenflthisweek.com, nctm.org, healthdiaries.com, associatedcontent.com, sportsrubbish, marininstitute.org, advertising.about.com, renewableenergygeek.ca, sunlifestadium.com, answers.com, twitter.com
More on Green Sports
Ultimate Boarder Takes Sports and Green to the Extreme
Green Sports: Washington Post Get On Board
Attack of the Green Monster

Tags: Sports

Best of TreeHugger