Banksy uses toy animals to highlight animal cruelty and factory farming [Exclusive Photos]

banksy factory farming animal slaughter photo
via Banksy

The world-renowned street artist, Banksy, is in the midst of a month-long residency in New York City, with a new piece being installed each day in a different neighborhood around the city. His latest is in the Meatpacking district and is a creepy, but clever take on factory farming and animal cruelty. Called "The Siren of the Lambs", the piece is a mobile artwork using a truck carrying stuffed animals with amplified toy animal noises to bring attention to the cruel conditions real animals suffer when being transported from factory farms to slaughterhouses.

Banksy/via

Yesterday, Gothamist reported an early sighting of the piece, which was confirmed by Banksy today.

Banksy posted the following video of the piece touring the Meatpacking district:

Here's another video of the piece:

This is not the first time Banksy has used his art to make a strong statement about the treatment of animals. In 2008, his "pet store" installation used animatronic chicken nuggets and sticks to highlight our relationship to animals and eating meat.

In 2010, following the BP oil spill, Banksy transformed a kiddie dolphin ride into a statement on how the oil spill was harming dolphins and other sea life.

You can find even more Banksy artworks that are related to the environment here.

To stay up-to-date on the latest Banksy NYC works, you can follow the artist on Instagram, Twitter and BanksyNY.com.

UPDATE: Well, I sure got lucky today. I happened to be on a rare drive in Brooklyn's Williamsburg neighborhood and suddenly found myself right in front of the truck! I took advantage of a long stop at a red light to snap a few photos. I can confirm other reports that this thing is LOUD! It was impossible to ignore, so this piece is surely getting a lot of attention as it cruises around New York City.

© Chris Tackett

© Chris Tackett

© Chris Tackett

Tags: Activism | Artists | Arts

Best of TreeHugger