Backcountry.com Feels the Wind Power in Its Hair

Late last year we referenced the Green Goat as an initiative of online outdoor gear retailer, Backcountry.com. It helped customers find the greener clothing and equipment amongst the vast 400 brand inventory that the company offers. Unfortunately that project seems to have languished somewhat, as none of the product links seem to work anymore.

But maybe that's because Backcountry's Green Team have been otherwise distracted. They have been busy calculating the energy load of the company and working with Renewable Choice Energy to offset it. To this end Backcountry.com will, in 2008, buy 1,500,000 kilowatt hours (kWh) of renewable energy credits (RECs), which is said to be the equal to taking 190 cars off the road for year.Company President, John Bresee, (pictured) said in a media release that,"These guys rock. Holland (CEO) and I are stoked to have employees who are passionate enough about protecting the places they play and passionate enough about Backcountry.com to lead our green charge."

That charge also includes implemented a recycling program that is described as being "300% more thorough and effective than the one previously in place." The green Team also set up a three-van commuter-pool in cooperation with the Utah Transportation Authority, which is said to accommodate 40 employees commuting to the Park City, Utah from from Salt Lake City. This apparently takes another 37 vehicles off the road.

Brilliant work guys. Now, if they can just get those green product links working again, their customers can join in and make environmentally preferred purchasing decisions. For, if the media release is to be believed, Backcountry.com is hearing the outdoor marketplace say, "Go Green." Customers follow that with "or we'll go spend our money someplace else."::Backcountry.com

Left photo: Matt Villano, New York Times

See also:
Patagonia Complete Solar Power Carpark
prAna is One of the EPA's Top 10 Green Partners

Tags: Corporate Responsibility | Japan | Natural Disasters | Nuclear Power | Renewable Energy | United States | Utah | Wind Power

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