Artist's Eerie Mirrored Sculptures Reflect (On) Nature (Photos)

© Rob Mulholland

It's human nature to want to leave something behind on this planet to be remembered by. And It's this driving force that Scottish artist Rob Mullholland examined in his 2009 art installation, 'Vestige,' for an exhibition he organized for Scotland’s Forestry Commission.

"They were sited in a very popular forestry centre near Aberfoyle, Trossachs, Scotland, which has about 250,000 visitors each year," the artist informed me last month via Email when I contacted him after coming across the sculptures online.

© Rob Mulholland

The area of Scotland that the six mirrored silhouettes were stalled in is a forest that was once home to small sheep farms and rural communities. After the First World War the farmers were moved to other lands so the area could be planted with trees to supply the demand for post-war lumber. He was so intrigued by the area's history that he wanted to visually represent the land's past inhabitants.

To some, the sculptures look like the alien in Predator when it uses camouflage to blend into the jungle. Others may see the T-1000, played by actor Robert Patrick, in Terminator 2: Judgment Day.

© Rob Mulholland

"The mirrored figures really caught the imagination of a lot people, both local and visitors alike," says the artist.

Take an Eerie Tour of Vestiges in 2009

The sculptures proved to be so popular he was commissioned to create six new figures for a permanent installation in the forest. The permanent installation, which went up last month, is a great honor for the artist.

"They normally have a very strict adherence policy about any man made interventions in the forest environment, so it's pleasing to feel that my work is deemed as an acceptable part of the overall visual experience of the forest centre," says the artist of the permanent installation.

He expects the mirrored stainless steel figures, modeled after friends, to last for decades. Perhaps not as long as the farmers the sculptures reflect on, but certainly long enough to make visitors stop and consider their relationship with the environment.

Tags: Artists | Arts | Forestry | Scotland