UK Announces Low Carbon Transition Plan - 34% Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions by 2020

Announced by Energy & Climate Change Secretary Ed Miliband in the video above, the new Low Carbon Transition Plan outlines how the UK will meet its goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions 34% from 1990 levels by 2020. (Thumbs up on those targets...) Keeping in mind that they've already dropped 22% based on government data and that the UK currently gets about 5% of its energy from renewable sources, this is how the plan envisions it being done:Most Emission Reductions Will Come From Greener Electricity
Overall, about 50% of emission cuts between now and 2020 are expected to come from greater use of green energy for electricity.

Towards that, 40% of all energy will come from low-carbon sources: 30% from renewable energy sources and 10% from nuclear (including new plants) and clean coal. With the longer term need to "all but eliminate carbon from electricity by 2050," according to Miliband.

Some seven million homes will receive pay-as-you-save energy makeovers and 1.5 million homes be supported in generating their own power from renewable sources.

As outlined in the Low Carbon Transport Plan, which aims to reduce emissions from the domestic transport sector by 14% in the same time period, the average car will have 40% lower emissions than it does now.

Offshore Wind & Tidal Power Get Most of Funding
To enable this, up to £120 million ($196 million) will go to develop offshore wind power, £60 million ($98 million) for wave and tidal power, and £10 million ($16 million) for infrastructure for electric vehicle recharging. To accelerate smart grid development, £6 million ($8 million) will be dedicated.

More: The UK Low Carbon Transition Plan and BBC News
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Tags: Carbon Emissions | Carbon Footprint | Global Climate Change | Renewable Energy | United Kingdom