Trashy TV Takes On a Whole New Meaning

Reality shows have taken over television, like a virus or a breath of fresh air, depending on your perspective. And we're about to add to that mix with Garbage Moguls.

But first, I'd like to pay homage to Planet Green. Love it or lump it, it has done more, earlier than any other media outlet to bring green thinking, living and acting to the masses. Rather than consign green minded TV to the dusty DVD collections of hippies low budget environmentalist skewed programs, Planet Green took the lead to make it appealing, useful, relevant and yes, sexy. Nothing wrong with a little sex appeal to grease the gears, I say! Alter Eco is a prime example. Adrian Grenier (of Entourage fame) has proven to be a visible, committed advocate of living greener, and this show sees him with a team of people doing both lifestyle and home makeovers. Sure, for some of you that's eye roll inducing. For many others, it speaks their language and gets them in the conversation, which is the point here.

Getting people outside "the choir" to see themselves as someone who can make greener choices in a way that fits their worldview and life is when the real change on an enormous scale can happen.

Josh Dorfman's The Lazy Environmentalist (on Sundance Channel), now in its second season, follows a similar path: a "...quest to save the planet - one wasteful couch potato at a time!" They don't take the softballs here: One show features a bakery owner who is extremely cynical of people's interest in organic, thinks agave sweetener is gross, and bases his intuition on what reactions kids have. A tough nut to crack, but Josh is up to the task.

I think it's great to have someone who clearly not only doesn't get it, and is actively in opposition. People like him say what many others who want to keep up appearances with friends are thinking: Going green is a sacrifice, tastes bad, and costs more. Answering these qualms and winning them over is an awesome thing to witness.

Wa$ted! gives the female perspective on this, and in its name, hits two hot buttons at once: We don't like wasting money, and we don't want to be seen as wasteful. Host Annabelle Gurwitch pulls the curtain back on things most of us would never think about: How much waste a bakery creates daily, and all the mess a kennel can generate (and I'm not even talking about the dogs!) But she couples it with actions they can take. You get the idea.

Following in these footsteps yet always walking our own path, this weekend on the 21st of August we're premiering Garbage Moguls, on National Geographic Channel. It's simple really, our aim: Change millions of people's minds about what waste is, what possibilities it holds, and our personal responsibilities (and great possibilities) around it.

Easy, right? We hope so.

We're trying to do several things at once: Show what it really looks like to run a green company - warts, celebrations, snafus and all. We also want people to see just what happens when you put a little creativity into how you look at something. For example, CDs. Are they just digital dinosaurs gathering dust in a box in your closet, or fishing lures? Are cookie wrappers just something to (regretfully) toss in the trash, or good kite material? What else can you do with a pet food bag after it's done?

Yes, this show is a story about TerraCycle, but ultimately, We hope to be an inspiration - to other businesses, to people looking to make a difference in the world, to people who've lost faith that business can be and do good in the world.

Tune in, let us know what you think, and if you've got ideas for the future of Garbage Moguls, we're all ears!
Read more about green TV:
DIY 3D Television For Birdhouses (Video)
World's First Carbon Footprint Certified Television - Is Energy Efficiency Old News?
The Third International Television Festival For Urban Ecology

Tags: Television | Upcycling