Tesla to Start Leasing Electric Roadster, Roadster Sport, Model S


Tesla Roadster Sport. Photo: Michael Graham Richard
How About Buying the Car but Leasing the Battery?
Thankfully, the latest news about Tesla are better than those of a week ago. The latest move by the company aims to make its products a bit more accessible to those who can't quite afford to pay over $100k for a car (a fair chunk of the population, to say the least). A leasing option will now be offered on the electric Roadster and Roadster Sport, as well as on the Model S when it comes out.
Tesla Model S. Photo: Michael Graham Richard

This offer is only valid in the U.S. for now. The standard contract is for 3 years, 30,000 miles, starting at $1,658 per month (!) with "$12,453 due at signing includes $1,658 first month's payment, $9,900 down payment, and $895 acquisition fee."

Ouch. That's still a lot, but I suppose that now the merely rich can think about getting a Tesla.

But I can't really complain; before Tesla, almost no automakers was investing seriously in electric cars, and even fewer were trying to make electric cars that were appealing to the average person who doesn't care about CO2 emissions. It's also usually the case with new technologies that they start out very expensive and not quite there technically, and then come down in price as they become more refined. Tesla played it smart by launched a luxury sports car as a first produce, because even if they had released an econobox sub-compact, it would still have been very expensive and even fewer people would've bought it.

It had to start there, and I'm definitely looking forward to the Model S and the next model after that. Leasing that third model probably won't be too expensive if they succeed in making it around $30,000.

"J.D. Power expects Tesla to sell about 1,000 vehicles this year, up from about 800 in 2009. Tesla hopes to see a sales surge in 2011 when it rolls out the Tesla Model S, a sedan that costs $50,000 after rebates, which will also include a leasing option." (Source)

Via Tesla Motors, WSJ
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3 Tesla Motors Employees Reported Dead in Palo Alto Plane Crash [Updated]
Tesla Files IPO Papers, Ending Production of Electric Roadster in 2011

Tags: Electric Cars | Electric Vehicles | Transportation

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