Stair of the Week: The Well of Chand Baori

The stepwell at Chand Baori, India, is a hundred feet deep and has 3500 steps. Legend says that it has so many steps to make it impossible for someone to retrieve a coin if it is dropped into the well.

It has a certain Escher-like quality.


Wikipedia writes that

Stepwells, also called bawdi (Hindi: बावड़ी) or baoli (Hindi:बावली), are in essence wells in which the water can be reached by descending a set of steps. They may be covered and protected, and are often of architectural significance. It can be multi-storied also in which a bullock turns the water wheel ("Rehant") to raise the water in the well to the first or second floor.

All forms of the stepwell may be considered to be particular examples of the many types of storage and irrigation tanks that were developed in India, mainly to cope with seasonal fluctuations in water availability. A basic difference between stepwells on the one hand, and tanks and wells on the other, was to make it easier for people to reach the ground water, and to maintain and manage the well.


From Oddity Central) via Weburbanist

Other stairs of the week:

Stair of the Week: Clayton St House by Mork-Ulnes Design
Stair of the Week: The Prefabs at Home Delivery
Stair of the Week: Folded Stair by Kevin Low
Alternating Tread Stairs: A Roundup

Tags: Architecture | India | Wayback Machine

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