New York Times on Green Collar Jobs


Jim Albert, a technician for General Electric, climbing to the top of a wind turbine in Sweetwater, Tex., where the turbines stand as tall as 20-story buildings.

It is appropriate that when every business story is downbeat, the New York Times produced an entire section on the opportunities that await in green careers and business.

"Presidential candidates talk about the promise of "green collar" jobs — an economy with millions of workers installing solar panels, weatherizing homes, brewing biofuels, building hybrid cars and erecting giant wind turbines. Labor unions view these new jobs as replacements for positions lost to overseas manufacturing and outsourcing. Urban groups view training in green jobs as a route out of poverty. And environmentalists say they are crucial to combating climate change." ::New York Times

At Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center in California, a nurse wears nitrile gloves in an intensive care unit, where an infant is connected to an incubator with phthalate-free tubing.-Jim Wilson/The New York Times
A Turn to Alternative Chemicals

An interesting article in the section is about green chemistry. Says Joel Tickner of the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production at the University of Massachusetts,"We're at a turning point," Dr. Tickner said. "Companies and states are taking leadership where the federal government isn't." "It's not about banning chemicals one by one, but about thinking more holistically about how we use chemicals in the design process itself." ::New York Times

SunPower workers install panels in Norwalk, Conn. The company is helping clients with financing, too.-Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times
Pay for the Power, Not the Panels

"Solar power is simple, clean and easily installed, but manufacturing solar panels is expensive, which is why this energy source is out of reach for many residences and businesses. Lately, however, solar power companies have discovered that they can attract more buyers if they act as financial intermediaries as well as suppliers of equipment and systems used to generate electricity from sunlight." ::New York Times