How to Boil a Frog and Maybe Save Humanity (Video)


Image credit: Peak Moment/How to Boil a Frog

From the Findhorn film's warning that consumer society is impossible without oil, to Escape from Suburbia's search for a life after fossil fuels, we're not short of movies that give a sobering account of the status quo, and a compelling case for doing things differently. But I doubt there is anything out there that is quite like Jon Cooksey's How to Boil a Frog. Not only does it connect the dots between over population, global warming, peak oil environmental destruction and economic inequality—it sets out to make us laugh in the process. Jania Donaldson of Peak Moment TV sat down with Cooksey to find out more. Working from the premise that all of the above issues are part-and-parcel of the same macro problem—overshoot—Cooksey explains his wake up call that global warming was just one symptom of something larger. He then goes about encouraging people to look for solutions. Real solutions. (He's clearly not a fan of anything that just sets out to maintain the status quo.)

What I really like about this conversation is Cooksey's careful deliberation of what motivates people and how we can inspire action. He's determined not to alienate anybody—establishing that we are all imperfect and muddling through as best we can—and while he's not into sugar coating the massive steps he believes we need to take to head off disaster, he's also realistic enough to think through what might, and might not, be realistic given our human wants and needs. We are, as he notes, selfish beings. ("I know the Earth gives me water and oxygen and food. But what has it done for me lately?")

Looks like good stuff. Available now via the How To Boil a Frog website.


More from Peak Moment TV on Sustainability, Peak Oil and Activism
Backyard Permaculture in Oregon
"Your Money or Your Life" Author on Finance, Sustainability and Happiness
Living Simply as an Alternative American Dream
Economist David Korten Says "Get Rid of the Wall Street Mafia"

Tags: Activism | Peak Oil | Permaculture | United States