From The Forums: Cheering for high gas prices?


burnfromwithin wrote an oldie but a goodie still getting traction in the forums:

Is anyone else secretly cheering for higher gas prices?

It seems like so far the higher prices have led to people consuming less. I have been consuming less for a couple years, but that is out of concern for the environment, not because of gas prices. When I do drive, I drive a really efficient car, so I don't mind higher gas prices as much - they don't affect me.

I would like to see more people cut back on driving or find other ways to get around - and if high gas prices are the way to do it, then I guess I support higher gas prices!


Hermione says:

I remember once my aunt said she wished gas would rise to $10/gallon so then maybe then people would take the bus. Here's me venting on the topic:

I've heard that 50% of the people on earth live in cities. Certainly not a large portion of them live in cities with remotely adequate bus systems.

Those of us who live in small communities have no public transportation. It is true though that carpooling, walking, biking are possibilities for some of our transportation.

The people who have the least choice about how they get from A to B are rural people. Some people live 30 or more miles from a gas station, grocery store, or even a nearest neighbor for that matter. These are the people who actually need SUVs and hefty pick-ups. These are the farmers who put food on all of our tables...and have to use diesel to do it. I'm not aware of any hybrid, hydrogen, or electric large farm machinery.


hillsidedigger:

Much higher gas prices is likely for the better and will help make America energy independent

for

#1 - Consumption will be lower as people, corporations and government adjust their spending to involve less fuel consumption

and #2 - The more expensive energy resouces in America will now be worth developing.

It will create many high paying domestic jobs particularly in the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains.

I still think the unroaded wilderness at ANWR is worth more left as it is than the little bit of oil that might be there.

My own $.02 is that I'm torn on this issue. While no one wants to see people who are struggling have to face even tougher times, it is during difficult times that we as a nation are at our best. So I want to see gas prices shoot up, because I think Americans are often only willing to change when change is forced upon them.

Like the Great Depression and WWII, we need something to shock us out of our consumption coma and pull us together as a nation to solve this impending crisis before it is too late.

What do you think?