Free2Work Phone App Spots Child Labor in Products While You Shop


Image: Screenshot via Not For Sale

Ethical shopping is no easy task. It's often hard to know which companies use child or forced labor, and which stick to paying adequate wages and other fair labor policies. But a newly released phone app helps consumers with just that kind of information: from Hasbro toys to Nike shoes to Apple gadgets, Free2Work has the information you need to ensure you're not supporting child labor—all on the go, from your phone, while you shop. Based on the Free2Work website, the phone app lets you browse companies and how they scored on labor policies, as well as get updates from activists and check out videos and photos from the field.

Released by the Not For Sale Campaign in conjunction with the International Labor Rights Forum, Free2Work was named one of the 11 Great Apps for 2011 by the SF AppShow, and is available for download directly from iTunes.

Not For Sale explains more:

So far, the website has evaluated and rated a broad range of the top
products in the US market from garments to electronics to children's toys and food
using a comprehensive rating tool. Some of the companies that have already been rated
include: Apple, Adidas, Gap, Hanes, Hasbro, HP, Levi's, Nestle, Nike, Puma, Skechers,
Timberland and Wal-Mart. As part of the project, many of the companies rated are also
working to improve their ratings by strengthening their policies to eliminate labor rights
abuses.

If you've still got last-minute Christmas gifts to get and want to avoid unfair labor in your purchases, or if your New Year's resolution is going to be to support more ethical companies and less child labor, Free2Work is definitely worth checking out.

More on child labor
Are These Unethical Fashion Brands Hiding In Your Closet?
The Labor Department Acts Against Child Labor in Cocoa; What's Hershey Doing?
Blood Sweat & T-Shirts: Child Labor (Video)

Tags: Appropriate Technology | Clothing | Conspicuous Consumption | Fair Trade | iPhone | Shopping

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