Five Record-Breaking Trash Cans


Image from NowPublic
Ahhh trash, we live amongst it although perhaps without as much esprit de corps as our furry green friend. Trash comes in all substance and sizes - brown banana peels, sticky popsicle wrappers, the occasional ship which needs to be scuttled - but one bit is clear: we are obsessive about collecting these cast-offs. This large variety of temporary and permanent resting places are known as 'Trash Cans' and have a record book all of their own - Grouchy Oscar himself wins the Trash Can Award for most widely recognized. Click-thru for four other odd, exotic, record-breaking garbage receptacles, including one triple record holder!

Japanese Adjustable Can (Most Versatile) Give me a can to adjust and I will save the world; this classy orange and white model has three different size gradients so you can adjust it depending on how much trash you're generating. Perhaps keeping it at 'level one' will encourage some household garbage reduction - save the bigger levels for all out fetes with the neighbors and even then, no over-the-toppers or compacting allowed. From ToykoMango



Image from 80feetroad
Top of Mount Everest (Highest)
Digital Journal reports that there are currently over 120 tons of litter strewn atop of Mount Everest, giving it the record for highest trash can. The mess includes climbing equipment, food, oxygen tanks, aluminum cans, clothes and tents: the usual high-tech luxuries that gets immediately jettisoned when you're about to die of frostbite. There's at least another 50 tons of trash at the base camps on the way to the summit as well, most of which will never be removed due to the extreme conditions. China is trying to do something about the problem by limiting expeditions from its side of the mountain, but many climbers see the move as too restrictive.



German Sidewalk Collector (Deepest) Into the void; at first glance this collector from Hamburg seems normal as only the top red part is visible. Until it's emptied - the multi-story, 400 liter iceberg of a can comes out of the ground whole, and has a split side for easy emptying. Less emptying means saved time and costs, and free entertainment for onlookers as well. From DeputyDog



Image from Science ray
The Moon (Biggest, Most Remote, and Most Expensive) A box without hinges, key, or lid, yet 170,000 kilograms of high-tech metallic junk is hid. Science Ray eloquently explains how the moon became a trash can in just a few short decades. From the all out early crashes (destroyed on impact), to the barely functioning circa-1960 telemetry equipment (Luna 9 survived for a mere three days) to the present, there's a dizzying array of items up there. Some of the notables include an American flag, a gold olive branch, three Lunar Buggies (non-working, but proving that we can't live without our cars even on the moon), and a plaque reading "We Came in Peace For All Mankind". Apart from a few pieces of still-functioning equipment the rest of the items on the surface of the moon are redundant. Much like Everest, one might assume that when you are in an oxygen-scarce vacuum 384,000 kilometers from home and carting your junk out costs about $40,000 to $60,000 dollars per kilogram, the executive decision is made to 'let it be'. Hindsight, 20/20, perhaps the plaque should have read "We Left Pieces of Mankind for All Comers".

Trash Cans
Big Belly Solar Powered Trash Can
The Trash Masher
Concept Can for Sorting Recyclables

Tags: Pollution | Technology

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