College Students Help Tailgaters' Remember to Recycle

When their team hit the field a couple of days ago, Sustain Mizzou’s Green Team hit the parking lots to help tailgaters’ green the party. In fact, the environmentally aware student group at the University of Missouri-Columbia was already busy handing out recycling bags to tailgaters four hours before the MU game even took place.

Impressively, they’ve been doing the same at every home football game for three years now. And just last game alone they collected 2.74 tons of trash and kept it from heading to the local landfill. Last year they collected 19 tons of recyclables during the seven home games played at their school, with the year prior seeing 11 tons kept out of the landfill as well.
The trick to their success has been making it as convenient as possible for tailgaters’ to recycle, running patterns through high-traffic areas during and after games to replace full bags and keep the cans and bottles flowing smoothly. The only difficulty they’ve encountered is that some people inevitably wind up putting trash in the bags along with their recyclables. That occasionally makes things unpleasant for the student volunteers, as one of them succinctly put it “We don’t feel we should be Dumpster diving or filtering through people’s trash."

But ultimately their efforts have received a tremendous amount of support from both tailgaters’ and a wide array of groups who help keep the program rolling along. For instance, the city of Columbia provides two roll-off bins to collect aluminum and plastic at the games, local businesses offer incentives, partners such as the MU Athletic Department, a local company donates their signs, a landscape service provides the trucks and golf carts necessary to facilitate the efforts, and even Anheuser Busch comes through with bags, bins, shirts, windbreakers and $2,000 that helps provide food for volunteers.

I’m wondering what other schools have similar programs in place?

See also:: Top Ten Tips For Starting a School Recycling Program

Via:: Columbia Tribune

Tags: Recycling