CO2 labeling on my beer can?

Summertime, and the living is easy... If only.

By summer next year, I will not be able to just sit back and enjoy a can of my favourite beer on a beach, I will also be reminded of the CO2 emmissions printed on the can. Cheers!

Sapporo Breweries have announced that they will print on the labels of canned beer how much CO2 is emitted per can from the cultivation of barley, including the production of aluminum cans. through to delivery. Similar ideas have been announced by supermarkets in the UK and Sweden, but this could be the first time a corporation decides to go ahead and provide CO2 emmission data directly to consumers.

They will rely on the ISO 14040 Life Cycle Analysis Standard, and deal with tricky issues like Life Cycle Analysis.

A Sapporo Breweries official said consumers will be able to choose products by checking corporate measures against global warming as well as other criteria. Other leading food makers, including Kagome, are also considering introducing similar labeling systems. Sapporo hopes that if the practice becomes common, it will provide a guideline for consumers to choose products and encourage firms to work harder to reduce CO2 emissions.

Actually, you can often find a lot of cool data, including CO2 emmission reduction efforts, if you read a company's CSR Report online. Corporate Social Responsibility includes environmental disclosure to stakeholders. Sapporo Breweries and many other food companies are a part of the Environmental Ministry's ambitious Team Minus Six campaign to reduce emmissions by 6%. And Japan’s Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry will be working with companies to create the rules on how to calculate CO2 emissions and label it on food products.

Written by Martin Frid at greenz.jp

Note: Images of movie stars and singers promoting beer is as old as Western foods in Japan. The top photo from the beach is one of my favourites, and this one at the bottom is from an early 20th century poster featuring several beers that were popular when people in Japan still wore kimonos, and not bikinis.

Tags: Japan

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