Canadian Celebrates World Water Day By Using Just 25 Liters of Water, 8% of North American Average


Image: parthisix via flickr

Yesterday was World Water Day, but one man in Canada is stretching the day out and is dedicating the month of March to raising awareness of water scarcity. He's limiting his water consumption to 25 liters a day for all cooking, drinking, cleaning, and sanitation purposes, and has gotten 31 others to also sign up for what he's called the Water Conservation Challenge.IPS reports on the efforts of Kevin Freedman, who has a blog where he and the other Challenge participants are sharing their tales of water consumption.

It's not easy to cut consumption to 25 liters down from the continent's daily 330-liter average!

But in many parts of the world, consumption is just a fraction of that 25 liters—and not by choice.

More from IPS:

Nearly a billion people don't have good access to safe fresh water. In a single generation, that number could double as growing demands for water will exceed the available and sustainable supply by 40 percent, according a recent study. "Peak water" has already come and gone. Humanity uses more water than can be sustained, drawing on non-renewable reserves of water accumulated over thousands of years in deep aquifers.

"Water cannot be created, it can only by managed," said Margaret Catley-Carlson, a former senior official with both the Canadian government and at the United Nations.

To learn more about water scarcity around the world, check out the film A River Runs Through Us, AfricaWaterWire.org or a report IPS released [PDF] for World Water Day. Jaymi's post yesterday is also rich with more info.

More on World Water Day and water conservation:
Happy World Water Day! 22 Key Stories for Understanding Water Issues
Will 7 Billion People Make Us Smarten Up About Water? A Look at Technology, Supplies, and Politics
Save Our Oceans for World Water Day: 10 Ways
It's World Water Day! Give a Hand to 8 Top H2O Activists

Tags: Africa | Canada | Drinking Water | Pollution | Poverty | Water Conservation

WHAT'S HOT ON FACEBOOK