Campaigners Occupy KFC's Facebook Page to Oppose Forest Destruction

Kentucky Fried Forests/Promo image

Rachel already posted on a 10-year old who is pressuring KFC to stop destroying forests in the Southern US. But Cole is not alone. Today, KFC's Facebook page is likely to receive visits from countless angry citizens, myself included, who are demanding the fast food giant take immediate and concrete steps to formulate a robust, sustainable packaging policy. (In the interests of transparency, I should note that I am not an impartial observer. In my day job I helped create the branding for the Kentucky Fried Forests campaign.)

According to The Dogwood Alliance, the mountains of waste that KFC creates each day are being harvested from some of the most fragile ecosystems in the US:

"“KFC is as committed to the environment as we are to our food and to our customers. We are proud of the steps we have taken so far to reduce our environmental footprint and are committed as a brand to do even more in the future.”

The above quote is from Kentucky Fried Chicken’s own website. KFC talks a lot about environmental responsibility, heritage and community, and we agree with these values. Yet its actions are not consistent with its rhetoric. KFC’s packaging is directly contributing to the destruction of our Southern forests. While other leading fast food companies are working hard to adopt sustainable packaging policies, KFC continues to make its famous buckets from trees that were “harvested” from endangered forests across the South, including The Green Swamp – a unique, irreplaceable forest in Brunswick County, North Carolina.

Of course from vile, unhealthy breadless chicken sandwiches to its complicity in the cruel, factory farming system, there are many other things that most greens would love to fix about this corporate behemoth. But if other fast food giants can take steps to ensure more sustainable packaging, then surely this is the least that KFC could do to move things in the right direction.

Check out the Occupy KFC Facebook page for more information

Tags: Activism | Biodiversity | Conservation | Corporate Responsibility | United States