British Columbia Carbon Tax Criticized on Eve of Implementation


Couldn't find a good photo of Williams Lake so this beautiful photo of trees in BC will have to suffice. Photo by haRee via flickr

Announced this past February, British Columbia's carbon tax is set to begin on July 1, and though it's a legislative done deal, that hasn't stopped Scott Nelson, mayor of Williams Lake, from criticizing the plan.

Reuters has quoted Nelson as saying, "The last thing [residents of his community] need now is a tax on top of these soaring prices to add insult to injury." He also predicts that taxpayer revolt will scuttle the new tax.
The provincial tax will add 2.41 Canadian cents to a liter of gasoline (9.13 cents per gallon), and according to the government is designed to reduce carbon use, not generate new revenue. In addition to cutting other taxes to offset this carbon tax, BC residents are receiving a one-time $100 rebate check this week.

Supporters of the tax say, perhaps predictably if nonetheless accurately, that in addition to the tax not ultimately hurting the economy, avoiding the issue now will only result in greater hardship in the long-term.

A question for readers:
We all acknowledge (I hope...) that the long-term costs of not dealing with climate change will far outweigh prevention costs incurred now, but in your opinion is there a way to ease the burden on people who moved to the middle of north tumbleweed when fuel prices were low and now are having their bills rise rapidly?

Should they just pay the price for their lack of foresight or should the burden be spread across all of society somehow? Perhaps a national individual carbon tax, not assessed at the point of sale? Not necessarily advocating that; just throwing it out there as an example.

What do people think?

via :: Reuters
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Tags: Canada