A Call To Green Arms

Costa Rica and New Zealand both have declared their intentions to become carbon neutral. The most striking similarity between these two disparate nations is that both are blessed with great hydro-electric capacity. Quebec, and New York State, where are you? Costa Rica and New Zealand need reinforcements. You need development. Go for it.

In May 2007, Costa Rica's government announced it was drawing up plans to reduce net GHG emissions to zero before 2030. The country aims to reduce emissions from transport, farming, and industry, and to clean up its fossil fuel power plants, which account for 4 percent of the country's electricity (of the rest, 78 percent comes from hydropower and 18 percent from wind and geothermal power). In addition, through an innovative program begun in 1997 and funded by a gas tax, the government compensates landowners for growing trees to absorb carbon while protecting watersheds and wildlife habitat. Costa Rica aims to be the first country to become carbon neutral.

But Costa Rica could be in a race with New Zealand, which last month set the target of becoming "the first truly sustainable nation on earth." Prime Minister Helen Clark announced in a speech on September 20 that her country will adopt an economy-wide program to reduce all GHG emissions, with different economic sectors being gradually introduced into a national emissions trading program that should be in effect fully by 2013. Other commitments include an increase in renewable electricity to 90 percent by 2025 (up from 70 percent today), a major net increase in forest area, widespread introduction of electric vehicles, and a 50 percent reduction in transport-related emissions by 2040.

Via::World Watch Institute, "Costa Rica and New Zealand on Path to Carbon Neutrality" Image credit::CBC, Niagara Falls

Tags: Canada | Costa Rica | New Zealand | Quebec