2010 Tesla Plane Crash Investigation Still Ongoing


Image: Youtube screen capture

A Few More Answers, But Still Lots of Questions

Last year we reported that 3 Tesla Motors employees lost their lives in a plane crash over a residential neighborhood in Palo Alto, California. At the time of the tragedy, there were more questions than answers about what happened, though we could take a few guesses. A new report by the National Transportation Safety Board provides a few answers, though it will take many more months for federal investigators to determine what happened with any degree of certainty.


Image: Youtube screen capture

The SFGate reports:

The report by the National Transportation Safety Board cites recordings made by a police gunfire detection system, which captured the plane's final moments, in concluding that "both engines were operating near full power."

The federal board also said both the plane's propellers had been recovered and that "no indications of propeller failure prior to impact were found." [...]

Five of East Palo Alto's ShotSpotter sensors caught sounds of the plane's engines moments before the crash. In one chilling recording, screams of people witnessing the crash can be heard.

It was a foggy day and the plane hit high-tension lines and a 60-foot transmission tower, so chances are that the bad visibility was the main cause of the accident, but it's possible that something else contributed.

The men who lost their lives in the crash were Doug Bourn of Santa Clara, a senior electrical engineer; Andrew Ingram of Palo Alto, an electrical engineer; and Brian M. Finn of East Palo Alto; a senior manager of interactive electronics.

Here's the short news item that appeared at the time:


See also: Elon Musk Answers Reddit's Questions on Everything

Via SF Gate

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Tags: Transportation