11-Point Initiative For A Nuke-Free World


Image of Titan II Nuclear Missile from liamr

Japan has today announced a plan to host an international conference to promote global nuclear disarmament. Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone praised US president Obama, saying his plan will give momentum to the growing "mood" for nuclear disarmament. According to NHK World and other sources, Nakasone said he strongly supports Obama's stance, in which the president clearly stated that he would pursue a peaceful and safe world without nuclear weapons:


"Nakasone said Japan is the only country that can objectively present evidence on the destructive aspects of nuclear weapons. Japan experienced the US atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 at the end of World War Two."

After the fold, Japan's new 11-point initiative for a nuclear weapon-free world:Breitbart.com has the list of 11 points, noting that Foreign Minister Nakasone of Japan calls for:

-- leadership of and coordination between the United States and Russia in advancing global nuclear disarmament.

-- nuclear disarmament, including reduction of nuclear weapons, by China and other nuclear weapons-holding states.

-- transparency of nuclear armaments possessed by all nuclear countries via regular, sufficient information disclosure.

-- irreversible nuclear disarmament by all countries that possess nuclear weapons.

-- study on future verification of nuclear weapon dismantlement.

-- ban on nuclear tests and ratification by the United States of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty at an early time.

-- ban on production of nuclear fissile materials for weapons.

-- imposition of effective global restrictions on North Korea's ballistic missile development.

-- international cooperation on promoting civil nuclear energy with three principles of ensuring nonproliferation, safety and nuclear security.

-- safeguard measures by the International Atomic Energy Agency for all countries pursuing peaceful use of nuclear power.

-- prevention of nuclear terrorism by strengthening control of all nuclear and radiation materials.

Breitbart: Gist of Japan's 11-point initiative for nuke-free world

Photo: Greenpeace International

I like how president Obama inspired this new wave of anti-nuke debate in his Prague speech earlier in April. President Obama’s has said he wants to conclude negotiations on a new treaty to succeed the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty I (START I) by the end of 2009, pursue ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), and initiate negotiations on a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT).

What do you think? Can we acheive a world free of nuclear weapons, in our generation? Are the two issues (nuclear weapons and nuclear energy) connected, as Greenpeace has suggested for years, or not?

Can we have one without the other?

Incidentally, as I was searching for images for this post, I was surprised that there are so few photos of nuclear missiles on the Internet. While you can find photos of almost anything else on the Internet, why are weapons of mass destructions still not better known? Are they kept secret because we would all revolt if we knew more about them? It reminded me that some things remain taboo, even in this era (supposedly) of information.

What I did find was the Titan Missile Museum in Arizona. It is the only publicly accessible Titan II missile site in the US:

Tour the underground missile site. See the 3-ton blast doors, the 8-foot thick silo walls, and an actual Titan II missile in the launch duct. Visit the launch control center, experience a simulated launch and more!

Brought to you by Martin Frid at greenz.jp

Tags: China | Japan | Russia | United States

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