Weather Weirding: Record-Breaking Snow In Northeast & Amarillo, Texas

Mike/CC BY-ND 2.0

If you live anywhere from Philadelphia, through New York, New Jersey, and lower New England you don't need to be told how abnormal the snow over this past weekend was, or that it set records. But you may not be aware just how unusual it really was. For that, Jeff Masters at Weather Underground lays out the details. Masters describes the storm as "simply unbelievable".

In New York City, Central Park received 2.9" of snow, breaking the previous record of 0.8" set in 1925; in the Bronx, 6" of snow fell. North 45 miles, in West Milford, New Jersey 19" of snow fell, with 5.2" falling in Newark, just west of New York City.

And that's just the start of it. Places in New Hampshire and Massachusetts received in excess of 30" of snow. Concord, New Hampshire recorded its second-largest single day snowfall in history as 22.5" fell between 3pm on Saturday and 7pm on Sunday.

But it's not just the Northeast seeing high snowfall early in the season.

On the 28th, Texas saw its first snow of the season, with Amarillo getting 3.1" of snow and areas to the southwest of the city getting 5". Not hardly the scale of the Northeast snows, but for the date it broke a record going back to 1911.

Putting that into the context of the ongoing Texas drought: Earlier in the week Amarillo saw temperatures of 86F and is 14" below normal for all precipitation for the year. The snow that fell in Amarillo brought 25% of the city's entire precipitation so far this year.

Oh, and while I wouldn't go so far as to link all this directly to climate change as that can only really be done in hindsight and looking at the overall trend and other weather factors, it equally isn't evidence that global warming isn't happening.

Tags: Global Climate Change | Global Warming Effects