IBM Shows Off Cool Technologies for Water Mangagement (Video)


Screenshot via IBM video

IBM has been working hard on improving technologies that help with water quality and management. The company feels that managing water is equally - if not more- important as managing electricity, and technology can be a big part of the solution. IBM has just released a new, fun video that highlights problems surrounding water, and what new tech IBM feels can greatly improve how we monitor, measure, use and conserve water. IBM is serious about the impending water crisis. Their latest blog entry puts the fear in readers:
"Have you ever thought that one day you might turn on a faucet and no water would come out? Did you ever consider that getting a glass of water from a restaurant could cost money? While these scenarios might seem far-fetched today, a water crisis is looming -- and if we don't get serious about smarter water management, it can - and will - become a reality."

We're more worried about not being able to get water at home or to farmers, than paying money for a glass of water at a restaurant; nevertheless, we're glad IBM is looking at ways technology can help us improve our water habits.

John Cohn explains how smart technology is helping with water management, including visiting the Champlain Water District which supplies IBM's semiconductor manufacturing site with water.

It's not all about technology, though. Sometimes the best moves are ultra low-tech, like making water-friendly food choices, taking short showers, ditching lawns and other water wasters, and of course changing regulations in the most water intensive industries like agriculture and manufacturing so that water is used wisely.

IBM states, "Within the next fifty years, the world population is expected to increase by another 40 to 50 percent. This population growth - coupled with industrialization and urbanization - will result in an increasing demand for water. But overall, little has been done to address this crucial issue. In his recent speech ushering in the Decade of Smart, our chairman, Sam Palmisano, pointed out that applying smarter technologies to drive cost out of legacy systems and institutions--doing more with less--would be critical to near-term and long-term economic prospects. He emphasized that we need to do more than extend the useful lifetime of our infrastructures - we must ensure that next-generation systems are inherently more efficient, flexible and resilient."

WATCH VIDEO: Discover how one company in the Southwest United States is turning oil wells in to water wells

Doing more with less is the key to staving off a water crisis. Technology can help. So can awareness and concern from the people using the water. IBM is helping in this area too, working with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) on improving water supply and usage so they can boost water quality, avoid losing water during storms with poor stormwater systems, and improve the more than 1,000 miles of sewer system.

More interesting stats and details are available at IBM's Smarter Water Management page
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More on Smart Water Technologies
Clean Tech Forum 2009: Experts Discuss the Impending Water Crisis (Video)
Smart Water Technologies To Be a $16.3B Industry by 2020
IBM Equates Water to Electricity, Wants Better Measures and Management

Tags: Computing | Drinking Water | Water Crisis