Filtered Water In 2 Minutes with New UV Light Bottle Invention


Image via James Dyson Award

Most portable water filters use carbon filters, special membranes with microscopic openings, or chemicals like chlorine or iodine to clean the water and make it save for drinking. However, one of the best systems for purifying water is actually with ultraviolet light. But how do you get an ultraviolet light purification system into a small portable water bottle that can be used anywhere? One design and technology graduate has figured it out, and already won the UK branch of the prestigious James Dyson Award for his invention.
According to BBC, Timothy Whitehead, a graduate from Loughborough University, came up with the idea for the bottle while travelling in Zambia. Rather than using chlorine or iodine tabs which take half an hour to work and leave a gross taste in the water, this new bottle first filters particles four microns or larger from the water, then uses ultraviolet light (powered by wind-up) to kill 99.9% of bacteria and viruses. All within two minutes and all without altering the taste.

The Pure bottle is already quite advanced in the development process, including an "original filter designed which filters any soiled water down to 4 micron in particle size (fully scientifically proven); a wind-up Ultra violet light system has been produced, including a custom designed PCB to monitor winding frequency and to give user feedback when the water is sterile. The casing has been designed for both prototype production and manufacture."

Now that the invention has proven itself in the UK, it will face off with other finalists from around the world in October.

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Tags: Awards | Blue August | Bottled Water | Concepts & Prototypes | Drinking Water