Best Reading for Understanding Peak Water


Photo by Jaymi Heimbuch

The topic of Peak Water is always top of mind here at TreeHugger, and we're constantly reading up on the subject, from what exactly "peak water" means, to the implications running out of water will have on humans and ecosystems. How are we running out of water, what happens when we do, and how can it be avoided? It's a fascinating and scary topic, but there are a handful of articles that we think represent some of the best writing summing up the topic. Check out the must-read list for understanding peak water. Peter H. Gleick: Has the U.S. Passed the Point of Peak Water?
Water expert Peter Gleick explains the difference among peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water, and how we've passed the peak on all three.

Water worries: The drying of the West
The Economist reports on the state of the Colorado River and the fate of the cities (and states) it provides water for. As the Colorado represents similar problems with rivers worldwide, understanding its plight is important.

Passing the Point of "Peak Water" Means Paying More for H2O
National Geographic explains the price impact of passing peak water, and the reality of needing to pay true cost. The article is part of a great feature on freshwater, so once you read this post, poke around the rest of the site and explore the many ways freshwater supports life, and is in peril.

Peak Water and the Asian Water Crisis, Part One and Part Two
These two articles on The Angle cover definitions of peak water, the pros and cons of trying to define a term like this, and what water shortages mean for Asian governments. Because China and India are already suffering severe water shortages while trying to grow at a jaw-dropping pace, it is vital to understand how the East will cope with peak water.

Water Crisis : TreeHugger
For continuing coverage on water issues, be sure to check out our Peak Water section on TreeHugger.

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Tags: Conservation | Drinking Water | Water Crisis