Beetle-Inspired Dew Bank Concept Draws Water From Desert Air


Image via Yanko Design

Finding water where there isn't any is inspiration for a whole range of water-gathering concept designs. But it seems one of the best places to start for coming up with a winning concept is to mimic the plants and animals that can survive desert environments, such as, perhaps, the onymacris unguicularis or "fog-basking" beetle. It has developed a way to gather water that designer Kitae Pak saw was a perfect strategy to mimic with a water bottle design. The beetle sticks it back end up in the early morning air to gather moisture from the air, which condenses and drips down to its mouth so it can drink. Similarly, the Dew Bank shown off on Yanko Design is shaped to encourage condensation to form and drip down to a catch basin along its base.


Seems like a simple enough idea. Harvesting moisture from the air, including early morning fog, is already a well known strategy for gathering water. Having a simple and potentially inexpensive tool like the Dew Bank could be useful for those living in arid areas.

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Tags: Concepts & Prototypes | Drinking Water | Water Crisis