Using Augmented Reality to Change The Way We See Our Green World


The above video shows what augmented reality - taking in the real world on a device and layering computer generated data over it - could mean. Essentially, you can point your phone at something and the data for whatever it's seeing pops up on your screen. Here, houses are scanned and information for those for sale or for rent pop up. Or you can scan the neighborhood to find which bars you might like to walk into before walking up to the door. But, as Tom Raftery of GreenMonk points out, this is just the very tip of the iceberg of how augmented reality could impact green. It's not a new concept, but this software by Layar is some of the first we've seen put to work and that will actually soon be available for use.

Raftery notes the potential:

Imagine walking down the street and seeing emissions data for the companies/businesses simply by pointing your phone at them. Or pointing at machinery and seeing schematics, lifecycle emissions data, or…

And it's true the options are limitless. Layar will already make it possible to find clubs and bars in a neighborhood, but what if you could aim this at a row of restaurants and see their food sustainability practices before making a decision on where to eat?

How about scanning a shelf of products and seeing the carbon footprint data of each option so you can make a low impact purchasing decision despite the tricky labels and packaging the manufacturers use.

How might you want to see this kind of software used to make living sustainably an easier part of our daily lives?

Follow Jaymi on Twitter: @JaymiHeimbuch
More on Software for Green Living
7 Downloads That Turn Your PC From Energy Sucker to Energy Sipper
New Software Allows Wind Farms to Predict Output Up to Four Days in Advance
Supply Chain Emissions Software a Silver Bullet or Slippery Slope?
New Software Compares Food Miles, Shipping Costs, and Time in Transit

Tags: Carbon Footprint | Computing | Electronics | Gadgets

WHAT'S HOT ON FACEBOOK

New to TreeHugger?