MINIGAS Could Be Cheaper, More Accurate Greenhouse Gas Detector


Photo by Nortinirt

Monitoring greenhouse gasses could be made more easy and effective by governments with the MINIGAS. And companies from all over Europe are coming together to create the technology for a super tiny, super sensitive greenhouse gas detector. The miniature gas sensor is currently under development by a new European consortium headed up by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and funded by the European Union. No surprise considering how determined Europe is to clean up it's dirty spots.

The goal of the project is to create an ultra sensitive and tiny gas sensor, less than an inch long and twice as sensitive as current sensors of a similar size.

Better monitoring means more specific goal setting for air quality control and maintenance. But another big element is making the device affordable so it can actually be implemented. The device could then be used by consumers for improving air conditioning in buildings, as well as governments for security since the MINIGAS will be able to detect explosives vapors and chemical agents.

The project is an excellent multi-national effort:

The MINIGAS consortium brings together world-leading institutes and multinational companies from across Europe. VTT leads the programme, with the core photo-acoustic gas sensing technology also coming from Finland via Gasera, a spin-out company from the University of Turku. The Loffe Institute in Russia provides Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology and QinetiQ brings its miniaturisation expertise in addition to leading on exploitation. Two other multinational companies complete the team – Doble to market the sensor for greenhouse gas applications and Selex to sell MINIGAS to homeland security markets.

Seeing world-wide companies work together to create better tools for global climate change is encouraging.

Via Press Release via Gizmag
More on European Union Climate Action:
Fifteen European Union Countries Are on Track to Meet Kyoto Targets
European Green Capital Award
EU Scorecard on Environment Published
EU to Regulate Emissions From Airlines

Tags: Carbon Dioxide | Carbon Emissions | Pollution | Toxins