Greenpeace's Latest Green Gadget Guide Knocks Down HP, Lenovo, Dell

Lots of changes in the rankings has occured with the latest report from Greenpeace on greener gadgets. Three big companies get dinged for not following through on toxic phase-out promises, and another company jumps high up on the rankings for rapid progress towards green. Check out the results. Three major PC makers - HP, Lenovo, and Dell - are used to getting attention for their green efforts. However, Greenpeace is knocking them down a peg because they haven't sufficiently acted upon promises to phase out vinyl plastic (PVC) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) from their products by the end of this year.

Interestingly for the Dell/Apple duke-out, Apple is getting a rare thumbs up from Greenpeace, along with Acer, for moving forward with phasing out the toxic substances.

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If Apple can find the solutions, there should be no reason why the other leading PC companies can not," said Casey Harrell, Greenpeace International toxics campaigner. "All of them should have at least one toxic-free line of products on the market by the end of this year."

Nice little dig...if Apple can do it, then anyone can. But the point is made - there's no reason why all the manufacturers can't be making big strides in ditching toxic materials.

Philips deserves a gold star for jumping from 15th to 4th in the rankings, thanks to repositioning themselves to take financial responsibility for their e-waste. They need to put in place a system to act on the promise, but the promise has been made and Greenpeace is rewarding them for it.

"When they are paying for the collection and recycling of their own products, companies like Philips will now have the added incentive to develop cleaner, more recyclable products because recycling costs are influenced by the amount of toxic chemicals present and how easy products are to recycle," explained Harrell. "Individual producer responsibility is crucial to the greener development of the electronics industry."

Greenpeace's ranking guide is a great help for figuring out which manufacturers you want to patronize when looking for greener gadgets. Another great resource when looking specifically for computer equipment is EPEAT. The fact that these and similar third party evaluators are gaining so much clout tells manufacturers that they need to make green promises and follow through on them if they want to keep their status in the eyes of increasingly eco-minded consumers.

Check out Greenpeace's latest rankings on their website.

More on Greenpeace's rankings
CES2009: Greenpeace Speaks Up About Green Gadgets
Greenpeace's Updated Consumer Electronics Guide

Tags: Corporate Responsibility | Electronics | Gadgets | Greenpeace