Flat Screen TVs Worse For Climate Than a Big Coal Plant

And not just because of all the people sitting there using electricity and eating corn chips. 4,000 tons of nitrogen triflouride is used each year in the production of flat screen TVs and monitors. Michael Prathner of the Environment Institute of the University of California in Irvine claims that the stuff is 17,000 times as potent a greenhouse gas as carbon dioxide, and writes in Geophysical Research Letters that it has "a potential greenhouse impact larger than that of the industrialised nations' emissions of perflourocarbons (PFCs) or sulfur hexaflouride (SF6), or even that of the world's largest coal-fired power plants". It survives in the atmosphere for 550 years, and if this year's supply got out, it would be equivalent to 67 million tonnes of CO2.

''Nitrogen trifluoride can be called the missing greenhouse gas. It is a synthetic chemical produced in industrial quantities, it is not included in the Kyoto basket of greenhouse gases, or in national reporting under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change,'' Professor Prather said in the Sentinel.
''Nitrogen trifluoride can be called the missing greenhouse gas. It is a synthetic chemical produced in industrial quantities, it is not included in the Kyoto basket of greenhouse gases, or in national reporting under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change,'' Professor Prather said in the Sentinel.

The industry says that only 2% of it gets out, but Prather doesn't believe them. The stuff isn't even indispensable; Toshiba avoids using it. Another good reason not to watch TV. ::Guardian and ::Sentinel
Plasma and LCD TVs:
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Plasma TVs Suck (Electricity)
Lifehacker Tip: Buy the Right Size TV
Top Energy Efficient Telelvisions
Televisions Will Consume More Energy Than a Fridge

Tags: Chemicals