CES 2010 - Sharp Shows Off Solar Powered Car, New LED TVs, and Lovely LED Lights


Photos via Jaymi Heimbuch

Sharp was happy to show off its greener products at CES, starting with a big display for the Tokai Solar Car, pictured above. This vehicle is equipped with triple junction solar cells, which are incredibly efficient (and expensive). There was a tiny cell on display that was called the "Hope Diamond of solar cells" and it boasts an efficiency rate you may have a hard time believing. Check out that, plus other goodies from the Sharp booth.

This itty bitty cell is capable of just over 35% efficiency, and is the type we will see used for solar concentrators. Sharp stated that it's following all the strategies for solar - such as high efficiency, expensive solar technologies for use in space as well as lower efficiency, affordable technologies for terrestrial uses - and displayed at the booth were creations like this solar powered vehicle to a cell phone with a solar cell embedded in the back.

Sharp has been working on improving LED lighting. These new LED bulbs are the equivalent of a 60 Watt bulb, come in both warmer and cooler whites, and will have a life of between 40,000 to 50,000 hours, or about 20 years. They'll be released this year for a price between $50-100.

They're also looking at better solar powered lighting, such as this portable solar powered lamp. It is equal to about 25 Watts, which is dim, but as pointed out to me, when you're camping, 25 watts is usually plenty of light. The charge rate is impressive - for 3 hours of sunlight, you get 3 hours of light. Not bad for back up lights! We'll see this come to market in the fall.

Finally, Sharp unveiled LED-backlit LCD televisions. It uses Quad Pixel technology, introducing yellow into the red, green and blue spectrum for more vivid colors. The 52" version uses only about 100 Watts, which is a fairly impressive efficiency level. I'm told every single one of Sharp's new TVs will qualify to be on store shelves in California, now that the new efficiency mandate has passed. A 52" version of this television runs $3600, and the 68" is $6500. It's a whole lot of money to spend on a television in the first place, but eventually the electricity saved over the lifespan of the TV (and tvs usually have a lifespan of 10-15 years) would make up for the cost.

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Tags: Electronics | Solar Power | Television

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