Video Game Developers Want Authentic Electric Sports Car Sound, Record Tesla Roadster in Action

Photo: Tesla Motors
Roadster #203 Got Quite a Workout
Making a video game used to be all about a few guys writing code. But as the the industry grew into a mammoth, the production of games turned into huge enterprises employing tons of people and requiring more and more realistic sounds and images. One way to get realistic sounds is of course to go out in the field and record the real thing (we're pretty far from the BEEP BEEPs of old-school games). That's exactly what a few sound engineers from Microsoft Game Studios did when they found themselves needing some electric car sounds for the upcoming games Forza and Project Gotham Racing. Tom Burt, the owner of the electric Roadster #203 generously donated some sounds...
Photo: Tesla Motors
Won't Be Able to Use All Those Gas Engine Stock Sounds Anymore...
Here's how the car was set up: "The teams arranged to use a local motorsports park that was formerly a small airport. We met early (7:30 AM!) so they could mic-up the car. Two hours later, they had three large boom mics "suction-cupped" to the side and rear of the car, plus a mic in the trunk, and two up front over the swaybars and near the front tires, plus one in the cabin interior, the latter mostly to record verbal "clapboards" to identify each segment. A sound engineer with the recording deck rode shotgun and I did the driving."

Photo: Tesla Motors

They then proceeded to record the car driving at various speeds (in increments of 10 MPH), and over various types of pavement. Then it was time for more aggressive driving, with hard turns and tires squealing noises. "The team then asked for 'longer' squeal segments. We did tight circles just fast enough to keep the tires howling continuously for 30 seconds or so."

Looks like Tom was satisfied with how his electric Roadster handled:

The Roadster was a lot of fun to push hard and to deliberately get out of shape and recover. Handling was fun and predictable. As expected, given the stock suspension settings and tire sizes, the car moderately understeers or "pushes." I kept adjusting tire pressures, lowering the front pressures and letting the rears stay high as they heated, but could not eliminate the "push." So, I used the e-brake to initiate "oversteer"spins and give the team the more aggressive tire squeals they were looking for. Like most mid-weight cars, once you get the car to over-rotate, it spins quickly. What a ton of fun.

Photo: Tesla Motors

A couple of audio clips have been posted: Clip 1 and clip 2.

Clip 2 is the sound the Tesla made as it passed by at 119 MPH! Notice the lack of engine noise.

In normal driving, Tom said that he got about 250 whrs/mile from his Tesla, but his average during that day's hard driving was over double at 567 whrs/mile!

Via Tesla Motors
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Tags: Electric Cars | Electric Vehicles | Transportation


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