Tesla voluntarily recalls its whole fleet to check for potential seat belt defect

Tesla Model S
Promo image Tesla

Inspecting 90,000 electric cars

Tesla has just announced the biggest recall in its history. Granted, it is a short history, but still, recalling your whole fleet is as big as a recall can be. Thankfully, it's a voluntary recall based on a single incident report in which nobody was hurt, but what happened remains alarming: In early November, a European Tesla owner sitting in the front seat turned around to talk to a passenger in the rear seat and part of the seatbelt assembly broke. Yikes, not something you want to see happen, especially during a crash.

Tesla Model S interiorTesla/Promo image

That's why Tesla is recalling the 90,000 Model S EVs it has produced so far. It will check the seatbelt assemblies and make sure they are as solid as they should be. The Model X, which is just starting to roll off the assembly line, isn't affected, presumably because it has a different seatbelt assembly design. The rear seats in the Model S are also unaffected by this recall.

The company believes the problem that happened to the European customer is due to a manufacturing error. It hasn’t spotted the issue in further tests, but you can never be too careful with this stuff, which is why it wants to inspect all its cars (despite the bad publicity, this is a good thing; not all auto manufacturers do this -- there are multiple cases of known defects that didn't lead to recalls, costing some people their lives...).

Tesla Model S P85DTesla/AirBNB/Promo image

Tesla owners are being asked to schedule a visit to a Tesla service center for an inspection.

Via Tesla, Reuters

Tags: Electric Cars | Electric Vehicles

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