Formula Zero World Premiere in Rotterdam, Motosport at its Cleanest

Rotterdam, home of the first Sustainable Dance Club due to open next month, the Happy Shrimp Farm and Enviu eco-innovators, to only name a few, is now hosting the world's first international championship for fuel cell powered racers this August 22 - 23. Formula Zero is a World Premiere that researches and promotes zero emission technology through organising races. It is a new zero-emission race class for open fuel cell single seaters. The only rule: zero emissions.The 2008 Championship is a competition between university teams that develop their own fuel cell kart. This race class will scale-up to full-size racing cars, as commercial interest and the technology develop. Formula One cars gain speed to over 200 miles per hour, whereas Formula Zero cars a the moment, reach just over 30 miles per hour. But according to Discovery Channel's documentary about the zero emission racers in the Netherlands, "speed is not everything. Forumla Zero can change life as we know it; they race for the future." So this new kind of fast is clean, and all hydrogen.

Why hydrogen? Forumla Zero explains:

Hydrogen has the potential to become a truly sustainable energy source because it can be produced from renewable sources like biomass, wind and solar power. Fuel cells turn hydrogen into electricity emitting only water. Hydrogen in combination with fuel cells is a serious zero emissions alternative for conventional combustion engines: safe, practical, clean and efficient.

According to Godert from Forumla Zero, "there is one step beyond Formula One, and that is Zero. We are the next level of motor speed racing."

So if you feel you belong to the new generation of race fans, who love watching fast cars driving around in circles producing zero emission, visit Rotterdam city centre this month to witness some promising technological innovations. Visit the Formula Zero web site to meet the teams, and find out more about fuel cell racing. Thanks Oriol P. for the tip! ::Formula Zero

Tags: Alternative Fuels | Carbon Emissions | Fuel Cells | Global Warming Solutions | Netherlands | Renewable Energy