BRT Keeps Going In Latin America: Construction Of First Line Begins In Buenos Aires


Photos: Paula Alvarado.

Ever since Jaime Lerner used it to radically transform transit in Curitiba, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) systems have spread all over the world. Why wouldn't them? They work similar to subway networks but above the ground, and cost a 1/20 to build.

After hitting Latin American cities like Quito, Bogota, Mexico City, Sao Paulo and Santiago de Chile, BRT is finally arriving in Buenos Aires (with a three year delay from its announcement, but still). Take a look at the works inside.

The first line is being built in the south west part of the city, an area relegated from subways and trains that is usually covered by very slow buses.

With 21 stops, it will connect passengers with existing subways and trains on both extremes and it expects to reduce travel time 40% for 72,000 passengers who do the route everyday.

BRT systems are present in more than 150 cities around the world, in all five continents.


Image: Buenos Aires Government.

The Metrobus in Buenos Aires is framed under the city's Sustainable Mobility Plan, which is pushing bike usage with new bike paths and a bike sharing system, among other measures.

More On Bus Rapid Transit
Developing Cities from India to Colombia Leapfrog Ahead With Clean, Green Bus Rapid Transit Systems
Curitiba's Bus Rapid Transit: 2.3 Million Passengers a Day
Can BRT Encourage Bike Use?

Tags: Argentina | Buenos Aires | Buses | Public Transportation

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