5 years after going on sale, LEAF battery packs are WAY more reliable than gasoline and diesel engines

Nissan LEAF UK
CC BY-SA 2.0 Flickr

That's better than the failure rate of internal combustion engines

In the past 5 years since it's been for sale, Nissan has sold 165,000 LEAF electric cars globally and 35,000 in European countries. Together they have driven more than 1 billion kilometers (620 million miles). That's about long enough to see if the EV skeptics were right about batteries being unreliable, wearing out after only a few years of daily use. Well, turns out that - so far - the European LEAF fleet is doing pretty well. Failure rate for batteries are less than 0.01%, which makes them more reliable than a gasoline or diesel engine, according to industry averages.

Analysis by independent British insurance specialist, Warranty Direct, indicates that 0.255% of vehicles on its books had experienced an issue that led to an immobilization of the internal combustion engine. Common problems ranged from leaks in the coolant system and damage to the head gasket to engine flooding. Data from Warranty Direct is based on analysis of a basket of 50,000 cars aged 3-6 years old over a five-year period. (source)

So 0.01% is not just a little bit better. It's a lot better.

Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0

Here's a little video produced by Fully Charged's Robert Llewellyn for Nissan about this. They even interview a LEAF owner who drives the actual LEAF that was used in a Top Gear episode (a very popular car show which has been spreading all kinds of BS about electric cars for a while) to see how she's doing years later:

Via Nissan

Tags: Electric Cars | Electric Vehicles


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