2010 Detroit Auto Show: BMW ActiveE Electric Car


Photo: Michael Graham Richard

Will be Available in Limited Numbers for Leasing

Most of you probably know about the MINI-E, an electric version of the MINI made by BMW to do real-world EV testing (and exploit a CARB loophole, some say). BMW says that it will repeat the experiment, but this time with the ActiveE, a converted BMW series 1 coupe.


Photo: Michael Graham Richard

Under the Hood of the BMW ActiveE

"The BMW Concept ActiveE has allowed BMW to explore new vehicle packaging solutions and components which will be crucial to the success of the Megacity Vehicle. The intelligent integration of drive components within the existing vehicle package of the BMW 1 Series Coupe offers the opportunity to provide four full-size seats and a luggage compartment with a capacity of 200 litres / 7 cu ft. The motor, specially developed for the model and located in the rear axle, delivers 125 kW/170 hp and provides maximum torque of 250 Nm / 184 lb-ft. It accelerates the vehicle in less than 9 seconds from zero to 100 km/h (0-60 mph in approx. 8.5 seconds)."

Sounds like a more practical car than the MINI-E for every day driving.

One of the downside of being an EV is that the ActiveE weights about 3,900 pounds, but weight distribution is close to 50/50, so handling should still be decent. I suspect that this high weight is partly due to the fact that this is a conversion job and not a car that was designed from the ground up to be an EV (for example, the Nissan LEAF is estimated to weight about 2,800 lbs).


Photo: Michael Graham Richard

"The electric drive system draws its energy from new, advanced lithium-ion battery pack developed jointly by BMW and the co-operation partner SB LiMotive especially for the BMW Concept ActiveE. They enable a range of approx. 160 kilometres (100 miles) in everyday use. An intelligent battery management system helps achieve this range largely independently of external climatic conditions. Additionally, the charging period required for the lithium-ion batteries is very short. On the European power grid, the battery pack can be fully charged in just 3 hours at a wall box with a current of 50 ampere at 230/240 volts. In North America, using a high-current (32 ampere continuous) residential wall box, the charge time is about 4.5 hours."

Range is similar to the Nissan LEAF (but the LEAF will be made in bigger numbers than the ActiveE, and will probably be a lot less expensive).

More photos:


Photo: Michael Graham Richard


Photo: Michael Graham Richard


Photo: Michael Graham Richard


Photo: Michael Graham Richard


Photo: Michael Graham Richard

More 2010 Detroit Auto Show
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2010 Detroit Auto Show: Ford Introduces New Focus, Electric Version Production Starts in 2011
2010 Detroit Auto Show: Toyota FT-CH Hybrid Concept Might Join Prius Family

Tags: Detroit Auto Show | Electric Cars | Electric Vehicles | Transportation

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