Sleek Recycled Bikes That Look Like New, by Monochrome


Photos: Courtesy of Monochrome.

It's no news that buying second-hand anything is greener than getting something new, as you're not using more energy and raw materials for another product. However, not everything used is good looking enough for the aesthetics inclined.

With Monochrome Recycled Bikes, however, you get the best of both worlds: a previously owned bike that looks as cool as a new one. Find out more inside.

Monochrome is an initiative by Argentine designers Natan Burta and Alejandro Sanguinetti, who sought to rescue the high quality of old bikes with a new, fresh identity.



According to the designers, only 20% of the energy needed to produce a new bike is used in the recycling process of one of theirs'.

The bikes are painted with water-based inks, and given new stainless steel handles (avoiding the use of chrome). They're also given a new hand-sewed leather seat, something I'm not particularly thrilled about as a vegetarian, but I guess they can offer a vegan alternative.



Of course, recycling bikes is not a groundbreaking idea: we've seen bike cooperatives in LA, a massive bike warehouse in the UK, and countless amazing customizations of fixed-gear bikes.

The interesting part of Monochrome is, of course, the identity: how the designers could create a brand from the vast diversity of the bike jungle in Buenos Aires, and provide trend-seekers with a cool alternative that also rescues something old.

Besides the brand, of course, these images provide some inspiration if you want to grab a second hand bike and give it a new look.



There are five prototypes of Monochrome so far, and the designers are about to start producing in the next few months. For more info on Monochrome, take a look at their website.

More on Cool Bikes:
8 Designer Bicycles Two-Wheeling Fashionistas Will Want to be Caught Dead On (Slideshow)
Areaware Showcases Four Designer Bicycles
Finally, Design Finds the Mass Market Bicycle: A Review of the Electra Ticino

Tags: Argentina | Bikes | Buenos Aires | Upcycling

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