Ryanair Boss: Scientists Have "Nearly Always Been Wrong"

Image credit: Flight.org

Ryanair boss Michael O'Leary may come close to rivaling arch-climate skeptic Lord Monckton when it comes to craziness. Having ranted and raved about eco-loonies in the past, he's now laying firmly into the scientific community—labeling man-made climate change as "horses**t", and claiming that the scientific community has "nearly always been wrong in history anyway." Unsurprisingly, he offers very little in the way of evidence to back up his assertions. Clearly an excellent self-publicist, it would be interesting to know whether O;Leary even believes half the stuff he espouses. In a foul-mouthed interview for the Independent newspaper, he asserts that Global Warming doesn't exist, that scientists just say it does because they wouldn't get funding otherwise, and he makes the elementary mistake of comparing forecasting next week's weather with predicting the next century's climate models:

"The scientific community has nearly always been wrong in history anyway. In the Middle Ages, they were going to excommunicate Galileo because the entire scientific community said the Earth was flat... I mean, it is absolutely bizarre that the people who can't tell us what the fucking weather is next Tuesday can predict with absolute precision what the f**king global temperatures will be in 100 years' time. It's horses**t."

As Leo Hickman points out in his response to Michael O'Leary over at The Guardian, the man trots out the same old climate skeptic talking points that have been regurgitated over and over again. The sad thing is, I bet there are an awful lot of people out there more willing to follow the angry and incoherent arguments of a budget airline CEO than to listen to the reasoning of scientists that study this stuff for a living. It's a funny old world.

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Tags: Airlines | Air Travel | Global Climate Change | Ireland